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Infectious Disease Analysis and Its Effect On The Economy

By April 28, 2020 May 1st, 2020 No Comments

Live Interview with Dr. Karen Fowler on The Tetrault Show

Dr. Karen Fowler, PhD is a Professor in the division of Pediatric Infectious Disease at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

Dr. Fowler will be able to shed light and share her analysis on the infectious disease that has spread worldwide. She’ll be able to answer your pressing questions that you have about Covid-19. We’ll chat about the effect the coronavirus has had on the global economy, compare this with past outbreaks and much more.

 

View Transcript

Rob:

Enough waiting. Thank you guys for joining. I’m going to introduce our guests. Dr. Karen Fowler, doctor of public health professor at the division of pediatric infectious disease is at the university of Alabama at Birmingham. Thank you so much for coming today. Welcome to the Rob Tetrault. This episode originally aired on my YouTube channel, Rob Tetrault wealth advisory group.

All right. Good day everyone. Monday afternoon, April 27th great day to be here. Thanks for joining us. I’m Rob Tetrault, portfolio manager, Canaccord Genuity wealth management, head of the Tetrault wealth advisor group. Great to be here today. I’m excited about our guests. Say we brought, we got an epidemiologist today and that she’s kind of a huge deal in the CMV world and the infectious disease world. She’s worked her whole life at this craft. I’m really, really excited. Before we get into that, Johnny mocks, let’s run a disclaimer. All right. So that says, reminds you that this is not, do not take the investment advice that we give on this show. I don’t know your personal situation. If you’re a client, great, we can, but otherwise this isn’t investment advice. This is one guy talking about investments and today we’re going to do more talking about a COVID 19 infectious diseases, viruses, vaccines, pandemics.  I’m excited to bring on our next guest and after we chat with Dr. Fowler today,  about all of the above, I’m going to do a bit of a recap about the,  the market, the stock market towards the end of the show. So,  enough waiting.  thank you guys for, for joining. I’m going to introduce our guests.  Dr. Karen Fowler, a doctor of public health,  professor,  at the division of pediatrics, infectious diseases at the university of Alabama at Birmingham. Thank you so much for coming today.

Dr.Karen:

Thanks for having me Rob.  greetings from Alabama.

Rob:

Yes, Alabama. Our favorite state of all the States for Canadians. I actually was lucky enough to, to visit Alabama was that last year I was in Birmingham. That was crazy international scene conference here. It was so fun. That was so fun. And you were such a great host and  we had met before that I think we met probably the first time either in Atlanta awaits or perhaps in Austin or Utah, one of the CMV conferences for sure

Dr.Karen:

back a while, a while ago.

Rob:

Yes. When I started kind of doing some of my,  my  volunteer work for the Canadian CMV foundation. So tell me about,  your career and your life. I know you’ve spent the majority of your life research life, I should say,  working in the CMV world. First of all, CMV, what does it stand for? Obviously I know that, but what is it and what is it and why G, how do you get involved there?

Dr.Karen:

Right. So I  am an infectious disease epidemiologist that’s worked with cytomegalovirus or CMV and this is a virus that can affect newborns. The mom acquires the virus and transmits to the fetus and then the baby’s born with congenital CMV infection if they’re, if the baby, the mom transmits to the baby. And so seeing bees, herpes virus, and the problem with CV is it can cause a lot of damage for the infant. You can have an infant born with no damage or you have an infant that’s born with maybe hearing loss. They could have other issues or cerebral palsy,  you know, some, some other neurologic conditions. So it’s a real spectrum. And some infants actually die of CMV. So, and when we talk about it, it’s, it’s fairly common and it’s, it’s like seven and a thousand in the United States. And in Canada we’ll have,  a baby with congenital CMV infection.

Dr.Karen:

And if you talk to women, they’re going to like, what? I’ve never heard of this. And so about 91% of women have never even heard of it. So almost always parents tell us, wow, I heard about it when my baby was in the NICU or I heard about it from my OB when, you know, things weren’t going well during my pregnancy and I don’t even know what this is. So, so that’s what we’ve dedicated. So we focus, I focused on that,  sort of the epidemiology of maternal and congenital infections and hearing loss in children, CV related hearing loss,  also in trying to prevent CMV. I think I’ve come full circle from being in public health, but I’ve been in a clinical department,  all these years and we’re focusing now on some behavioral interventions and trying to prove that, you know, that these work that you can change. I mean, we all know behavior is hard to change, right? So trying to change, but mothers, pregnant women are very motivated to change and say these are simple things they could do such as well hand-washing, which we’re all doing now. Right.

Rob:

It’s crazy that it’s crazy that the kind of the preventative measures that you and I have talked to parents about for years on CMV is now we’re now seeing it in full effect in our day to day lives because a COVID,

Dr.Karen:

that’s great. And so the other thing we encourage women to do is not to share Slava with their toddlers, their own children or any other children and  ever seen V. But yeah, but you obviously right now don’t want us there. So Sheriff’s a LABA due to COBIT 19. So,  you know, we’re all practicing those things and  I’m trying to message. So I think, you know, hopefully it’ll be curious to see in about eight or nine months whether we see a decrease in congenital seam infection rates because women have been washing their hands. I don’t know. We’ll have to see if we can,

Rob:

it has to, right. It has to, there has to be a reduction in infections naturally just by the cause. That’s what we preach people to do and I think they’re doing it. I think that there’s many more people, especially pregnant mothers now are being extremely careful about hand washing and everything else. Right, right, right. I think really interesting. Hey, I want to ask you, in the years of research,  the, the, the amount, what’s, what are you the most proud of in your body of work on the research side or just what you’ve accomplished?

Dr.Karen:

I think overall the being able to define,  populations where V is more,  and working in the field and kind of pushing it forward that way because those are very important things to know even for the vaccine manufacturers. Like what, where should we test this? You know, where should we look for the women who are going to be at increased risk? And the United States women who are at increased risk or are African American women, which is surprising. You don’t see that everywhere. But you do see in the United States, but also young women. And so I’m trying to choose the right population. So I think that, and then also coming full circle, you know, here I am, I’m getting older. I don’t want to show you my gray hair.  which is a problem now because none of us can go to our hairdressers. Right?

Rob:

And this is crazy. I’m terrible. I look,

Dr.Karen:

so, you know, coming full circle and talking about prevention, you know, and, and trying to change behavior, not just vaccines but also in behavioral interventions, doing it all, everything we can to lower this infection from seven per thousand babies to, you know, at least one or two per thousand if not any.

Rob:

That would be fantastic. So as an infectious disease specialist, you specifically have kind of targeted your work on CMV and I guess there weren’t really any kind of, of all the epitome epidemiologists and the infectious disease specialists, no one was really targeted or focused on covert or not that many were, I would imagine.

Dr.Karen:

Yeah, I wouldn’t think so. I mean, the closest you would have is some of the  people who are doing respiratory viruses. Some of the influence,  that may have been modeling influenza,  epidemics or influenza yearly, seasonally.  but no, there’s really not. So what you’re seeing happening when you see all these people saying, Oh, I’m an infectious disease epidemiologist is, they’re jumping in from, from other parts of infectious disease. Maybe they were HIV,  researchers or such as myself, CV. And it’s not that we’re complete experts, but we understand a little bit about the virus, but each virus is unique.  I had a, we were at a party one day, not recent, not recently, unfortunately.  and  somebody said there were a whole bunch of infectious disease people there and like somebody who didn’t work in the field said, why do you guys call yourself? You’ll say, no, no, I’m CMV. And he’ll say, no, no, I’m HIV. They’re like, why do you call yourself viruses? But that’s how we talk. It’s like, so we know that, you know what we know? And then we’re sort of saying, well, we don’t really know that much about the other viruses, but we know enough. I think I know enough to be kind of worried about at 19.

Rob:

Tell me about that. Tell me more about what worries you about covert, I think

Dr.Karen:

worries me is how fast it exploded onto the, the world. You know what I was just thinking about it. I think we’re at what, over 3 million in the world today. Infections. And I remember like March 19th or so, looking at the numbers, we were at 109,000 and so think how fast, what we’re at the end of April. So in what, in six weeks. And so even at the beginning, you know, I mean it’s not surprising that this happened.  we’re having more and more pandemics, you know, if you think about it, more closely together. But this one is really, is affecting more and more people than ever before. And I don’t, I don’t think we’re at the end unfortunately. I mean, I know we were all sheltering in place, at least the United States, many States, but a lot of the States are tired of it.

Dr.Karen:

They’re worried about their economies, which is definitely a legitimate concern. I saw today that Tyson food, which I, I don’t know, Tyson foods, a big meat producer in the United States. So they have these large factories that do pork, beef, chicken. They’re saying that they’re having to shut down their factories cause I have cases and so it’s going to disrupt,  in the United States, there’s some weeks when you go to the grocery store having groceries delivered. You can’t get chicken or whatever. So it’s just, it’s very disruptive. And so we’re like, we’re done with this, right? I want it to be done. I don’t know about you, I’m done. But we’re really just definitely there. We’re definitely unfortunately at the beginning, so we don’t know what, you know, how long this is going to drag out, but you know, it’s moving pretty rapidly and unfortunately causing a lot of heartache and we don’t even know the long term effects yet of disease that doesn’t kill you. But did you get very, very sick with,

Rob:

I want to ask you about that, but just before that, I want to touch on the point you made about Tyson foods. They took out a full page,  editor, I think there was a full page editorial in the New York sun on the weekend. And the title was, I’m paraphrasing, but it’s basically the, the food chain, the supply chain of food is breaking down because we’re all eating the same stuff we were eating before, but there’s no production. The supply chain is breaking down. And it was a, it was a serious concern that he had the CEO of Tyson foods. I read it. It was really, really interesting. You know, we’re all thinking, okay, let’s just shut, you know, anyways, the impacts of that was really, really neat to see

Dr.Karen:

it rippling through the economy and our lives. Right.

Rob:

And I hadn’t thought of it. I hadn’t thought of that specifically. So it was neat to read about that. Hey, on the point you were just making the point that one, we don’t know what the impacts will be longterm, but also how long this is going to last. Any thoughts about, you know, what the future looks like in the next month or six months or a year with respect to Colvin because this is kind of what everyone wants to know. Right? And you have worked your, you know, you know more than I do about this.

Dr.Karen:

Well, we all are. You know, the thing is it’s moving so rapidly, not just the virus through people, but also the tech, the information. Like I have to admit, one of the positive things for covert 19 has been the scientific community around the world is working together as rapidly and as fast as they can. They’re their scientist in New York who are sharing their reagents, they’re doing whatever. I mean there’s, we have also flow issues with testing, so we have got to get testing up, especially in the United States so we can move forward. We need to be able to contact isolate people or we’re going to all be, you know, and I think we’re going to be in the United States at least. We’ve just finally agreed that we’re going to where, well not all of us, you know, we’re too independent but are going to wear a mask when we’re out.

Dr.Karen:

And I think that’s going to go on for a couple of months. And then what I think we’ll see as it’s going to slow down this summer. It’s not going to go away. And until, unless we do crazy things like decide to go to big, you know, concerts or, or sport events. And I don’t know what will happen to our sporting events in the fall. I don’t know how it compares and Canada, but, you know, college football is huge and United States and I don’t know how that, yeah, even though I’m a blazer go blazers.  so,  yeah, so that’s a huge deal. And so these things, so we’re, we’re gonna be uncomfortable with what the choices are and we have to go forth, but I think we can get a handle on this. I don’t know yet when, and I think anyone who tells you when,  is just guessing. I do know that some of the modeling suggests that when, if we could get down to one infection per million people, we could really handle that. But like most of our States aren’t there yet. Maybe Canada’s there or getting closer, but still, you know, we’re all struggling. Obviously New York city, new York’s not there. Alabama is not, even though we have fewer cases.

Rob:

what were you saying? Are you saying one infection per day per million people?

Dr.Karen:

Roughly. Yeah. I mean if you can keep it so that you have, I mean even lower, but if you can just keep it at that level, you could, you could target those individuals, find out where they’ve been and how to kind of monitor or key, you know, get people into isolation or quarantine, whichever is needed.  right now, how would you even find enough tracers or trackers when you’ve got, I think we had 200 and something cases yesterday. So how in the world can you do and how many people did they encounter? You know, and so that’s the big challenge, but that’s all over the world. And so we’ve got that to deal with.

Rob:

I liked that you used the number of million because that’s roughly the population of our province in Manitoba here. My province by province. And you know, I didn’t check today, but I mean we’ve kind of been in the one two some days it’s three or four, but it’s kind of been not quite as good as that. But it’s kind of been around that lately. But we’ve been like full shutdown here for a while anyways.  how I, I have a hard time wrapping my head around this concept.  Karen or Dr. Fowler, sorry, where is,

Dr.Karen:

yeah, you call me Karen. Anyway. We’ve known each other a long time.

Rob:

Yeah. Okay. So whatever you’re comfortable with, how does it kind of end, like how does it end? How does this, like, you know, the concept of herd immunity, I’m familiar with, and maybe you could touch on that. Does it, does it only end when we have herd immunity or does it end when, you know, how does this end? How does this go away? Or is it just part of life for the next 10 years?

Dr.Karen:

Well, I think, yeah, I think we need to build, we know we’re going to have to have herd immunity. Hopefully we’ll get it through vaccine, right? So if we can get a vaccine in place as soon as we can, and we can talk about that in a minute, but,  you know, we’ve, we’ve got to do that and we’ve got to go for it. I mean, when you think about what everybody calls swine flu, which was pandemic or novel H one in one, was that what in 2008, 2009,  you know, it was a problem for a while, but then the, because it was an influenza and we already had influence of vaccines, we were able, they were able to adapt it. And so within a year it became part of the influence of vaccine. So now when you get,  this fall, when we all get our vaccine right,  it will have that novel or that pandemic H one N one in there.

Dr.Karen:

So that’s why that doesn’t come back to get us every year. And it was a little bit milder than what we’re seeing with COBIT 19 right now.  but that’s what we’ve got to have happen. And it’s a little trickier,  with this virus,  for a lot of different reasons. But,  you know, that’s our goal. I mean, that’s the goal. You know, medicines try and, you know, doing all this is wonderful, but we really need a vaccine so we can ramp up herd immunity, but it’s going to be around, I think, you know, until we can, till we have herd immunity, you know, it’s going to be here for the next couple of years off and on. It’s going to flare up in certain parts of the world.  I don’t know how we’re gonna just, you know, distribute a vaccine,

Rob:

but cause you can’t really distribute a vaccine to 7 billion people effectively, you know, overnight or even in months or whatever.

Dr.Karen:

No, I think even when you think about,  in the United States a couple of years ago,  the sh the new,  shingles vaccine came out, you know, and that no one could get it because there was, you know, they couldn’t make it fast enough. So it took them about a year to map, to ramp up. So even if we get a vaccine,

Rob:

take me through that. Take me through that timeline. Let’s say we get a vaccine. I’m, I’m, you know this about me, I’m a huge believer in vaccines. I’m, I’m, you know, we’re raising money at the Canadian CMV foundation to directly fund vaccine research. That’s what I believe in.  take me through the timeline one to get a vaccine cause we’ve heard it from different people.  but I kinda like to hear it from you, what you think a reasonable timeline would be for a vaccine and then take me through what the timeline looks like afterwards to implement, to kind of produce it, to get a distributed, all that.

Dr.Karen:

I think that what we’re seeing now is we’re beginning the, the human studies of a variety of vaccines. So we’re beginning to see the testing of that. So at first they’re going to look at safety. Obviously we don’t want to give someone something that’s going to harm them or, or make it worse. And there’s also this strange thing that viruses can do and you see it more in the flaviviruses, which are,  you know, like dinghy fever. They can have, like sometimes if you give, if you’ve had dinghy fever for and get different strain, you have a worse outcome. So you also have to protect from that with a vaccine. We don’t want to give people a vaccine that makes COBIT 19 even worse. So that’s all gotta be handled in the safety evaluation. So that’s going to go on. Then they’re gonna do a face that’s probably a phase two study.

Dr.Karen:

Hopefully they’re moving along on those. And then we’ve got to get phase two started vaccine changes almost every day. Like I just saw, of course on Twitter, my source of information this afternoon was that Oxford in the UK, they are pushing forward with a vaccine.  and that seems to be really promising. And I know that my understanding is that bill Gates, the Gates foundation has put a lot of money into vaccines. So they’re, they’re really putting the money into testing a variety of vaccines. And what’s wonderful about that is there’s going to be some of them that don’t pan out right? They’re just there. They seem so promising, but they don’t go anywhere. But, and so it’s hard for a company, a pharma to come in and say we’re going to invest all this money and then lose it all. You know, you know, we have a responsibility obviously to our stockholders ever since we do our employees.

Dr.Karen:

So having foundations involved that are willing to give up that money so we can see they can move forward and so they’re moving forward. I think the NIH is testing,  I think, you know, all of the larger,  are have variety of, of, I mean there’s so many. If you go to the,  what is it? The clinical trials.gov you type in, you can see there’s all kinds. They’re all registered there. So if anybody wants to know all of that’s there, either antiviral studies, anything with monoclonal antibodies,  anything with vaccines, you can go there and see them all. I can’t even keep up. There’s so many that are happening. But so what we’ll do is after that they’re going to test them in a bunch of humans and we’ll see what if there are any adverse effects, like do they get high fever when they get this in phase two, that’s phase two into phase three.

Dr.Karen:

So they’re going to say phase one is, yeah, hopefully there. Yeah. Safety and a little bit in phase two is safety too. Cause you’re doing a few of these. One is a small scale, relatively quick vaccine, right? Yeah. And it’s sort of kind of determining dosage and you can do that some in phase two also. Like how much is enough, how much is too little? And then you’re looking at too is human typically always yes. And a slightly larger scale and a bit longer in length than in phase three is the larger scale. Right? So that’s gonna be a little bit larger scale. That’s when you look, you know, for efficacy, you know, is this really working? And we’ve seen it, you know, do we see a decrease?  you’ve got those take time cause you’ve got to go through a season, you gotta give the vaccination, do you give it a one dose?

Dr.Karen:

Do you do two dose a month apart? I mean there’s all these decisions that will be made and phase one and phase two and they’ll, okay, this is the magic dose. Whether it is or not, we don’t know, but this is the one we’re going to go forward. And that’s what we put into the phase three and we look for efficacy and that’s gonna take a little bit of time. So I think, I think,  I hope, and I pray it’s 18 months. That would be incredible. I think so we’re talking about, we’ve started,  maybe by next summer, you know, we could have something, but then,  but then after you’ve identified it, then you’ve got to turn to the, the, whoever’s producing the virus and you can imagine that to produce the amount of virus we need in the world and the bidding Wars that could start on such a, I, that’s beyond me.

Dr.Karen:

That’s politics. We can’t, you know, that’s really policy. And how you go forth, but,  it’s going to be a real challenge to, to, you know, get enough vaccine available for everybody. But, you know, on the other hand, maybe,  it tapers off a little bit. It doesn’t go away with heat. We’re not seeing that. Obviously, you know, there’s parts of Southeast Asia that are having an Africa and there obviously and you know, hotter than even Alabama’s hot, but not that hot yet.  so we’re still seeing it, but maybe, you know, there’s a Northern and Southern flu hemisphere Maxine, so maybe that’ll be something where you can stagger it through the year, depending on,  season a little bit of seasonality though. We haven’t yet figured out what that seasonality is for COBIT 19, but you have to do, like,

Rob:

would there ever be a situation where you would skip some phases of vaccine research? Like that doesn’t happen, right? And

Dr.Karen:

yeah, I think you can’t, I mean, you’ve got to know what’s safe before you inject it into 500 people or a thousand people or however many people you decide that you need for your efficacy.  and you’ve got to know if it’s even, you know, ethic efficacious before you start, you’ve got to know at least it worked in animals. And then you need to know that yeah, a few people, there was nothing. No one dropped dead first off. And then,  secondly, you know, and even those few, you know, what’s the, what’s the optimal dose? So you’ve got to do all those things. We don’t just go from a to Z. I mean, you know, scientists are very dull group. They like to go one step at a time and confirm and you know, always say that if you have three scientists in their room, you got four opinions. So they like to, they like to argue and discuss and say, well, I don’t know about this. What about the immune response? It wasn’t high enough. It wasn’t this, it wasn’t that. But the point is, I mean, all that aside, I think there is a commitment around the world to push this as fast as possible and to put forth. So

Rob:

it ends. When I asked you how this ends, you said while it’s vaccine and treatment, first and foremost, vaccine and treatment, are we going to be successful getting a vaccine? It’s going to happen and how much, how much, if efficacy do we need in that vaccine? Is it 70% 60%

Dr.Karen:

exactly. I don’t know the answers to those. And if I did, you know, I would give you, I would have a lot of money and then I would give it to you to invest for me.  so, you know, I don’t think any of us know yet. I mean, that’s what we’re trying to figure out. Just like every day.  you know, I can’t even keep up with the news that comes out of UAB. UAB is a big medical facility, so they’re everyday talking about, like today they said they’re seeing basically symptoms within five days.  they’re describing your each day. Like this last week they were talking about strokes and young people they were talking about, was it [inaudible] toes? I hadn’t even heard that to last week. So there’s all kinds of crazy things happening with this virus that we didn’t expect. And so it’s constantly changing.

Dr.Karen:

So is it a respiratory virus alone? Like the flu, influenza. It seems like it also have, you know, affects, you know, neurologically it may be doing some stuff, cardiovascular, you know, to the cardiac system.  we just don’t know. So that’s why we don’t really know what is the, you know, efficacy. I’m sure some people could, you know, guests or give you a very good, an educated guess. But I’m not sure I’m the person that can do that. And I would be uncomfortable. I, you know, I, I’m worried we, I mean if I lay awake in the middle of the night, to be honest, I worry will we have a vaccine and what does that mean if we can’t get a vaccine? But then, and daylight when I’m awake and it’s not so scary, I say we’re going to have a vaccine. We will, cause there were putting everybody’s brain from around the world together and we will do it.

Rob:

I think we’re going to do it for sure. You know why? We’ve got wonderful smart people like yourself and your colleagues and the people you know around the world, infectious disease experts that are working on it,  around the clock. And so much money is being pumped into this. I’m, I’m an optimist, Karen. I’ve always have been. I’m a glass glass is three quarter full type of guy where we have to be, we have to be because one for me it’s out of my control so I can’t even control whether the vaccine happens or not. So I’m not going to dwell on it. I’m not going to lose sleep on it. I’m going to do my absolute best to help preserve my client’s capital in this time, but I’m going to continue to be positive and I do think we’re going to get a vaccine,  in the meantime until we get the vaccine.

Rob:

Herd immunity happens generally kind of at what percentage of, cause I saw an article last week in the, I think it was on the new year, one of the New York States had like 14%,  positive and or antibodies for Colvin. And then I have two follow ups to that. The first question is, you know, that’s obviously surprisingly high, but nowhere near high enough to get her to immunity. I would imagine. My second question is,  what about the reinfection? And you and I both know about reinfection with respect. I should probably just take a quick pause and let our viewers know that,  I’ve talked about my role with CMV. So my role is as a parent and a charity fundraiser and the founder of the, and the founder and creator of the Canadian CMV foundation. And I met Dr. Fowler cause she works in CMV. So that’s kind of our relationship. But in CMV, as you know, better 10,000 times better than me, infection became a big thing. So in other words, a parent, a mom has the antibodies for CMV and while pregnant she gets reinfected. And as we now know, it’s, you know, it causes some disabilities as well. So do you see one, how high do we need to get that at that level of antibodies? And two, does it even matter if we can get reinfected

Dr.Karen:

right. Well, I think we, you know, I think we want to see herd immunity up 50, 60, 70%. So we’re not even anywhere close anywhere in the world to getting there.  you know, cause we want it, we, you know, just it makes sense. The fewer people that you encounter that are susceptible now reinfection. Yeah. That, you know, coronaviruses so the other coronaviruses that don’t cause a damage or all those common cold Corona viruses, there’s a variety of, of strains. And you know, how many times have you had a coal or your ch, or more importantly, we should say, how many times have your toddler or young child had a goal in a year? Probably five or six times. Potentially not have a cold. Exactly. Maybe that’s what we should ask. So, right. So we’ve got that. But you know, I have to believe that if you have been exposed and had COBIT 19, you know, you may, you’ve got, we’re seeing some evidence from the antibody test that you’re mounting some kind of response, some kind of neutralizing antibodies or antibody that suggests that your body is ready to be somewhat protective.

Dr.Karen:

So, even if you may get reinfected, which we don’t know really if that’s happening, it probably wouldn’t be as severe as the first time. So maybe it’s just you become one of those, which has implications for the population because you may become one of those asymptomatic or very mildly symptomatic. So you don’t change your behavior and stay home. You go out to the restaurant or you go to your job and you expose somebody else. So that, that’s a separate issue. But I think reinfection, you know, isn’t, I don’t know if we know that. I mean we’ve, there’s been some, you know, people said, well they were negative and they were positive. Well, our tests aren’t a hundred percent perfect, so maybe they were positive all along and we don’t really know. So I think the question of reinfection hasn’t been really rigorously scientifically tested. So I’m hoping that we can’t get reinfected, but if we can, even if we can, there should be some protective immunity there for us.

Dr.Karen:

So it, you know, it’s just like influenza. You can still get the vaccine and you get, you can get the flu.  you know, and that’s what everybody, that’s why people argue they don’t want to get the vaccine because they get the flu anyways. But the thing is usually your flu, much milder and, and very mild symptoms. If you get in, it’s much shorter duration. If you had the flu vaccine, even if it doesn’t match perfectly. So we just need to get a close match. I mean, a perfect match would be heaven, but a close match on that virus that just binds it and keeps us, keeps us safe.

Rob:

A perfect match. That means the virus has mutated obviously at some level. Yeah. Is that a concern? Okay.

Dr.Karen:

Well, sure. I mean, what, you know, these viruses are very, I mean, for, for from a virus point of view, if you kill off all your host, you’re not going to last very long. Right. You know, I mean, just from that evil virus is not really the point. But the point is you want your host to live because that’s how the virus attaches to this top of ourselves. Certain specific cells, it gets in and it basically takes over our cell. It makes ourselves a virus factory. So it, you know, it wants ourselves, but it doesn’t want to kill the host because then there wouldn’t be any cells. Right. So I think we could see this virus change. I mean, it’s likely it’ll change some and maybe it’ll change and be to a more milder.  let’s hope it doesn’t go more severe, but I think it’s more likely to go milder to survive in the population as a virus.  and so, you know, we don’t know, but I think the key is,  is, is to keep push forward with what we do know. And, and even if we had a vaccine that got the most damaging disease, stop that and stop death. That would be incredible. Even if we all ended up with a mild COBIT 19 infection. Right.

Rob:

That’s, that’s fantastic. Hey guys, just a reminder, I’m here with  dr Karen foller, a doctor of public health professor, a professor of the vision of pediatric infectious disease at the university of Alabama Birmingham. Please do send your questions in. Now we’re taking live questions from everyone. We were just chatting about reinfection, mutations of COBIT and other specific vaccine viruses. I want to ask you about,  behavior and what people, what you’ve seen. You know, if people are watching the show right now and they’re thinking, you know, what’s real and what’s not on the stuff I’ve read, you know, what kind of behavior have you seen that people should do or should do, stuff that you would either avoid or that you’re worried that there’s been some information on? Anything you want to clear up with respect to behavior? I mean, I’m not talking about don’t drink Lysol because I think we’re not going to be drinking Lysol here, but anything you can think of from behavior wise that you think is there’s misinformation out there?

Dr.Karen:

Well, I think there’s a,  it, I don’t know how it is in Canada, but in the United States we, we are not mask wearing people. I don’t know.  and, and there’s some challenges to that where if you notice, you know, if you look at,  China, Hong Kong, lots of Asia, it seems like they were masked very easily. I mean, you can, even when it’s not before COBIT 19, you know, a lot of times you can meet an airport and they’re wearing mask anyways, you know, for, because it’s influenced a season, but we’re very comfortable. So I think that,  I think a mass does matter. I think it helps. It not only protects you, but it protects people from you. I mean, of course like a cloth, we’re making cloth mass. You can’t get this special in 90 fives and you shouldn’t if you’re not a healthcare provider because there are not enough of them to go around.

Dr.Karen:

So we shouldn’t be trying to grab a wall up to par to, you know, if we have some fine. But, you know, we shouldn’t be trying to stock pile them in our garage or wherever and try to sell them on the side. But the thing is that cost, I mean, they’re not perfect, but you know, anything that prevents those droplet nuclei from spraying out through a cough or sneeze or just singing or projecting our voices,  to go forth. So,  I think that’s important. I think, you know, I mean washing, I don’t know that,  you know, we spend a lot of time worrying about, it’s on, you know, like you get packages now cause what, you don’t go to the store so you get delivery service.  you get packages, you know, we wait for the FedEx guide, you know, religiously cause he’s bringing stuff for us.

Dr.Karen:

but you know, there’s like, Oh, it can live on cardboard for 24 hours. It can live on,  plastic, you know, the virus. Well they’ve shown that they’ve been able to isolate virus RNA, but I dunno if that’s infectious virus. So I don’t know that we need to be like,  worrying ourselves to death about fomites. I think it’s very clear that how you get the virus is spending 10 minutes or more. Like if you just pass somebody, you’re probably not gonna get the virus. But if you sit there and chat with someone in a restaurant across a table next to you and work,  whatever that is, those are where you’re going to get the really strong infectious dose. And that’s why our healthcare providers, the nurses, the respiratory therapists, all that, they need those masks because they’re taking care of people have the highest viral load.

Dr.Karen:

They’re very, very sick. And so they’re there. So, yeah. So I think that that’s it. I think, you know, even though I’m still careful and now we’re getting into really hot time of the summer for Alabama, so, you know, I sometimes leave my boxes out there in the hot sun for a little while. I’m thinking, Oh, everything will be dead because it’s so hot to touch now. So sunlight does is a, is a natural disinfectant. I don’t think I, you know, but you know, hanging, you know, taking some and refreshing, we use it a lot, you know, in the South to hang out and refresh our cows and our sheets and stuff, even non-covered times.  so I think that’s, I mean, I think for me those are the two things is that, you know, I think math do matter and there’s a lot of debate. You know, how much they matter. But what does it matter if it decreases your risk? 50%. I mean, who cares, who doesn’t do it a hundred percent? Why not? And what does it got to? You might look, you know, you maybe you can get you a cute mask and not look foolish or maybe you want to, I mean who does, it’s kind of how you can express your feelings or your, your style with mask, right?

Rob:

Yeah. You get your favorite hockey player or something.

Dr.Karen:

Yeah. There you go. Your best game. Yeah.

Rob:

Your favorite quarterback for the Crimson tide. How would you feel about,  the, in Canada, what’s kind of really popular are these kind of, these driveway Hangouts, you know, where two people are hanging out on a driveway, you know, six, eight, 10 feet apart and they’ll spend, you know, an hour or two hours. Do you have concerns there?

Dr.Karen:

you know, I think if they’re 10 feet apart is just, that’s hard to do cause you tend to kind of keep getting closer cause you’re like, what, what did you say? You know, and  and we saw that we were over in Georgia and we were my,  husband and his brother. We kept saying no stand six feet apart cause we were just there for a few days, take care of some farm issues and  and he kept getting closer cause he couldn’t hear him and it was like, you know, as long as you can keep that distance. I mean, especially young people or people, I mean, I’m a little bit of an introvert so Hey, this hasn’t been that terrible for me, but I know my ex trovert friends, this is horrible. You know, they’re ready. I even eyes introvert, I’m ready to do something so you can imagine. But, so I get where people are coming from. I mean, I think,  you know, out in the fresh air, I don’t think the virus, you know, we’ve gotta be practical. I mean, we’ve got to be a little bit sensible. I mean, you know, we’re not going to keep our risk at zero unless we just do become hermits and never see another soul. And we can’t keep living like that. We are social creatures and we need that interaction and we, we realize how much we miss community when it’s taken away from us.

Rob:

How do you feel about the,  you know, the, the protest and the kind of the movement, I’ll call it the right movement to kind of reopen and reopen now and the argument that well, we’re going to kill ourselves by, you know, we’re going to do more damage to ourselves by staying indoors and with the vaccine. How do you feel about that argument and the protest specifically?

Dr.Karen:

Well, I think that,  as a scientist, I think this protester are a little bit crazy to me.  you know, yes, I understand our economies any and you know better than me.  Rob, you know, is being hit. But if we don’t get this under control, we are just at, you know, we’re just beginning to get the beginning ripples. We need to get this virus a little bit under check so that we can have a robust economy, you know, a world economy. We need it.  you know, and we want it. So I don’t think scientists are like against having an economy, but at the point is we could make this worse.  the protesters, I get it. They’re frustrated, they’re angry. They don’t understand, maybe in their community, they only know what, they only don’t even know anyone who’s it. Like if you just said a Manitoba, what you having a couple of, you know, a day.

Dr.Karen:

So the vast majority of people are saying, I don’t know anybody that has this and this is, I’m getting kind of tired of this. You know, I have a small business. I’m, you know, I heard today this I think was it Monday, the small business loans that came out from the government and the U S that it was already within a couple hours shut down, it was gone. And so there’s people and, and, and within that, there’s a lot of,  you know, all kinds of issues to access, you know, for especially our minority populations and not having the access that, you know, some of our Weipa, you know, so there’s all kinds of equity issues that are going on with that. So I think it’s important.  I do think they’re putting themselves at risk going out there without mask and protesting act like they have nothing.

Dr.Karen:

In fact, I think I just saw, I don’t know if it’s true, but one of the big leaders in North Carolina, she was asymptomatic, COBIT positive and was out there. So, you know, how many people did she in fact, I mean, and it’s not that, you know, you can say, yeah, it’s there. Right. You know, it’s my right to be infected. And maybe it is, but the point is the other people, right, it’s the other people you’re going to have to, first responders have to come for you if you can’t breathe, you know, the nurses, the doctors, the respiratory therapist, all of them get exposed because of you. And then if you expose too many people, if you know a certain number,  you know, you’re going to overwhelm your ICU, your ventilators, you know, everything that you need. And I think they said,  they were, there’s been arguments on both sides politically.

Dr.Karen:

You know, the, the election in Wisconsin and Milwaukee, I mean, they said overall it didn’t increase Cobra 19, but the health commissioner I think in Milwaukee said that actually they had some cases because of the, you know, they think related to people coming out to vote for the primary. Yes, exactly. Yeah. So it’s not like, so I wonder how many of those people that have been at those protests, if they’re out together co mingling, especially now that we’ve heard that one of the leaders is coded positive. 19 positive. So how many people as a leader do people come up and talk to her, you know, and if you know, and how long did they talk to her? Maybe they just said, hi, how are you? And pass down by there. Okay. But if they sat and chatted with her or worth or most of the day, then they’ve just been exposed.

Dr.Karen:

And so I want to ask you about who took a lot of flack in the last while or so in the last month or so. Let’s call it from some leaders.  with respect to how they, the timing, you know, you were talking to me offline before about some of the time in the video I checked out and I think that’s really interesting. So how do you feel about the criticism they being gay? How do you feel they’ve handled it? Their duty? I think the who, I mean they could use some improvements, but the bottom line is they have to respond to the world. And they are there for many of the countries who don’t have anything else. Parts of Africa, parts of, of central South America. And I think we need them. And so, and, and there’s a balance between what the West wants and what China wants and how things are viewed.

Dr.Karen:

But I think what’s interesting is I don’t think they’ve done, I mean they were slow to claim it was a pandemic and that was a lot of criticism from the scientific community for that. And I thought quicker, but they were trying to balance fear and there may have been doing a little bit of politics to that. We don’t know. But what was interesting is that China, basically the who I think it was December 35th, first 2019,  China informed them that they had a,  you know, a case, you know, a grouping of pneumonias. And so the WHR reported that now how long China knew that we could get into and discuss and you know, what they did and et cetera, but we don’t really know. Anyways, but then by January 12th, China, China had shared the viruses with who so that they could begin to work on vaccines, the virus at genomic the genome.

Dr.Karen:

So they knew exactly what they were dealing with and that’s why they started to say, Oh, this is SARS to, you know, severe acute respiratory syndrome. Part two, kind of like jaws part two, 2.0 yeah, 2.0 unfortunately. But now they were moved pretty quickly. So I don’t really, you know, I think that they’re there. I think they were reporting back to various people in the United States and I’m sure Canada elsewhere. But I think it was, I don’t think the message in the United States got through,  maybe elsewhere. It did. It seems like, you know, it got through in South Korea, they quickly mounted. If they don’t, their economy’s not closed, they’re functioning. We see that New Zealand, Australia had some criticisms too, you know. So do you think that there’s a, like is there a way that we could operate on this planet without an organization like w who?

Dr.Karen:

I don’t think so. I think we’ve got to have something like them and I think they get support,  from some foundations, but you know, I don’t see when we, you know, we have our wealth in the West and I think we can share a little bit of it. We don’t have to give it all away. And you know, and I think that we can ask for some changes, but I also don’t think we can be the big heavy in the, in the, in the, in the neighborhood to push. I think we’ve got to work globally together. And I think that’s incredibly important to bring. And you know, the who had tests that they were able to distribute out to the world, the U S decided not to take those tests and you know, that’s for the future to try understand that decision making. And I don’t think we know yet.

Dr.Karen:

There’s a lot of speculation, but I don’t want to speculate because I think it starts to get really political. But the point is, you know, what matters is we didn’t have a good, we came out of the gate in the United States behind and  and we’ve been playing catch up ever since. And this is a virus that we really should have been on time for because as you see, you know, we’re now,  United States will be at 1 million by tomorrow infections and that’s crazy. That’s crazy. Yeah, it’s unbelievable. And you know, I’m sure it will be at 60,000 deaths within the next few days or weeks. So it’s heartbreaking, you know, that’s, that’s a terrible story.

Rob:

I want to ask about funding, and I know this is a bit of a topic, but I understand that when SARS and MERS and Zika kind of came about, there’s typically a, an idea to kind of pump a lot of funding into that immediately so that we’re able to address it. Do you see, and I guess twofold, my question one, it can sometimes take away from other areas, but to, is this something that we should look at kind of funding permanently, like a, like a taskforce on, on pandemics or something like that. Does that exist in the U S like, and is it, is it funded enough? Cause we’re going to see more pandemics, right? You think you’re going to see more pandemics?

Dr.Karen:

Yeah, we’re going to see more pandemics. I mean, think about it. We saw one in 2003, it was SARS one,  didn’t get all over the world, but it, you know, it affected Asia. I think Canada got hit pretty hard with that. The U S not as much. So we’ve had Ebola.  we’ve had a [inaudible] swine flu, 2009. We’ve had mirrors, which is the middle Eastern respiratory,  another Corona virus. What, 2012, I mean, so that they’re happening pretty quickly now. Right. So we need that. Unfortunately.  it’s a very political thing.  president Obama left a task force in place and president Trump decided that he didn’t want people sitting around doing nothing. Those were his words.  and so he disbanded and so we started off behind. And so we need those kinds of organizations, you know, and also the global,  that tracked in 49 States through the CDC.

Dr.Karen:

and Atlanta, the centers for disease control,  was very smart people there. Yeah. They’re wonderful people and  and very good at what they do. And  and so they cut that to where they could only follow very few because the money. So it’s a, it’s a balance of the money and it should be treated like,  just like we do our threats to national security. Cause think about it, this is a threat to our national security. I mean, cause it affects our economy, affects everything that we hold dear and both in the U S and Canada and, and we, and we need to stop it. So

Rob:

I want to ask you about,  the wet bars in China,  these kind of, these kinds of markets or these wet markets, I think they call them where, you know, the virus is to have kind of come from. Is there a way you think or are those going to close down anything? Do you think that those are kind of a hotbed of virus of viruses like that? And what can we do about it?

Dr.Karen:

I think there’s going to be a push or call to try to separate, you know, both, both the trafficking of animals as well as these wet markets too, to put a stop to them anywhere we have human animal interface is where we’re going to see the next pandemic rise from. So whether, you know, in a Bola it was tracked to eating bushmeat, you know,  you know, so it, it was, it was there. We seen,  you know, in these wet markets before, you know, there’s always the Asian, you know, the flus, the bird, flus, the,  avian flus. You got the swine fleas where, you know, and, and it’s the swine flu in 20 2009 was out of Mexico. But really they’d seen that virus and swine in the United States, like in, you know, five, 10 years earlier. So it was definitely North America.  and so, you know, used to be, you know, just the people who were there, but it’s too easily to, to be able to make that jump into humans. So that’s where you look for the next. So yeah, getting rid of some of those markets, trying to control them and try, you know, also the, you know, the animal trafficking that goes on in Africa where, you know, I think we, we’ve got to try to, as a global effort push to stop that.

Rob:

Now. I was working,  with my 11 year old and my five years, first of all, my five-year-old asked me about Covin 19 and asked me, you know, how many other Covitz there had been before. Now I know that it’s, you know, it was named Kobe because it’s Corona virus 2019, but how, who decides the name, these things and how, is there a task force on naming of vaccines or phrases like the hurricanes or are they the list, the name?

Dr.Karen:

Yeah, I think the, who had did this one, I think they’re moving away from trying to designate a location because we are such a polarized world now. So, you know, we had the middle Eastern respiratory mirrors, MERS.  and so, so they will name them after a location, you know, whatever. But, so this one was attempt to say, okay, CEO is Corona VAR and then vis virus and D is disease [inaudible] 19 meaning 2019 not the 19th. Coronavirus you know, I guess. And so, and it caught, and the virus is SARS dash cov dash two meaning it’s a Corona virus. Some, you know, it’s number two versus number one, which was what we saw back in what, 2002 three. So,  so yeah, so there’s kind of a decision and like for a while to people, you know, on Twitter were calling every which thing and finally someone says, what are we going to call this? So I think finally the who said, let’s, let’s come to an agreement and do this. But I think,  it just sort of depends on who gets there first and says let’s call it this. And if everyone jumps on, I don’t know. We know we, I don’t know the answer to that actually. Truthfully, I should look that up. Maybe there is a naming task force that, you know, you get appointed to by the president or the governors or something. Who knows?

Rob:

That’d be interesting. That’d be interesting job. Yeah.  I do recognize that here that we’re running as slightly late on time. So before, before I, I definitely want to just take a second here to thank you and everyone. I do, university of Alabama at Birmingham, anyone, you know, in the infectious disease space that’s giving their time, their efforts to Kobe to solving this, to working on vaccines.  for us, I’m incredibly thankful. I’ve seen it kind of first hand on the CMV side though. The amount of work that you guys do, it’s unbelievable. We are going to find a cure for CMV. We’re going to find a vaccine for CMV. That one’s tougher. It’s going to take a bit longer, but we’re, we’re working on it and I’m thankful for all the work you do. You really are the godmother or the, you know, you’ve done so much receiving. It’s like you’ve done so much for CMV. Your name’s on every paper, every published. It’s, it’s just really remarkable what you’ve done. I do think extremely highly of you. I’m so thankful you were here today and I’m thankful for all the work you’re doing on Colvin as well, so I’m just going to say thanks. I will hopefully see you around at the next conference. I don’t know when that is. I know. Hopefully Ottawa, maybe not. If not, we’ll do in Cambridge or wherever. The next one is, dr. Father, thank you for joining me.

Rob:

Be safe in Canada too. Bye. Thanks Karen. Now you guys don’t leave yet. I do want to wrap up the top stories of the day. I really enjoyed that.  that was, that was one of my, that was neat. Talking with DR. Fowler about the vaccines and  the vaccine, the virus, what we’re doing, that the timeline is extremely neat to see kind of what she thinks will happen over the next while here. I do want to run through some of the headlines for you guys.  so the Dow today, a really neat on stream yard, if you’re able to see it at the bottom there, the Dow up 353 points NASDAQ’s up 95 points on the NASDAQ. Well, that’s really good day.  it was up like 80 when I last saw it at the end of the day, three 58, that’s a percent and a half on the Dow today.

 

April 27th, 2020 for the first time in, I want to say six weeks or five weeks at least. The Dow is closed above 24,000.  so 24,000. For those of you that are wondering why it’s a significant number. The reason 24,000 is a significant number on the Dow is because it’s roughly the halfway point between the previous high, which was almost 30,000 and the low on March 23rd, which was 18,000. So 24,000 is about halfway up,  back to where we were. So this is typically known as, you know, a recovery point. A lot of technical analysts follow this number extremely closely. A lot of analysts online are speculating that this is kind of a top, if you will, or, or,  you know, there’s been so much good news lately. The good news that we’re seeing right now, specifically,  we have not seen really earnings are going to start coming,  next, this week a little bit.

They’re gonna start trickling in the next week and the week after in Canada.  we’re gonna follow that extremely closely here on the show. If you watch me every morning on global TV at 8:06 AM I’m on every single morning and I do talk about earnings.  the other news that are moving the market positively is definitely the potential reopening of the markets,  of the, the economies.  Saskatchewan, our neighbor to the West has kind of made a plan. Ontario announced today their plan for reopening. I know that,  there are many governors in the U S many States are talking, re-opening, have, have kind of laid out plans,  Europe, Asia, there, there countries that have opened already. So,  there is now also a hope for a treatment.  there’s the idea now that we have the ventilators we need, we have, we’re getting closer to have the ventilators we need and having everything we need.

So there’s a lot of positive momentum right now with respect to the market. There’s a general,   kind of,  nonchalance with respect to the market. We’ve been closing this at 12 consecutive days where we’ve closed between 23,000. I’m using roughly, but between 23 and 24,000. So that’s a thousand points. That is a relatively narrow trading band as we call it in my world. And for 12 days when remember folks really not that long ago, we were up and down thousand and 2000 points pretty much every day. So this has been a bit of a top that’s forming and we’re really pumped to see it. I’m excited to see stability in the stock market. It’s been a, you know, we’re excited to see it. It’s been a while since we had seen it. So I’m excited to see that.  we do think for the record,  that there is going likely to be some bad earnings coming.

 

You should be expecting that, you know, people aren’t spending, people aren’t working, companies are, are closed, people have been laid off, so expect to see some fairly bad earnings and fairly bad earnings growth this quarter and the next quarter. So this quarter, earnings announcements are typically, typically first two weeks of may. And then there’ll be another kind of last week of July, first couple of weeks of August as well. We’ll be monitoring earnings. It’s really, really tough to see what earnings will do, but we’re definitely monitoring that as well.  again, the more news the fed the U S fed,  is, is, does have a meeting on interest rates this week.  there’s not expected to be a change to the benchmark interest rate at this time.  they may give guidance as to how long rates will stay low and they may do some other tinkering with asset purchases.

they may try to drive down longer term rates, but as of now, don’t expect there to be any move at this point on the rates.  what else happened today? The,  NASDAQ was up one in a 1.1%.  casinos, retail stocks, they’re rallying. So, you know, Las Vegas, San MGM,  they were up five and 9%. Those casinos and also have hospitality names. They were down a ton.  and Canada, if we look at the big headline city in Canada, Quebec is to reopen some schools. I was playing settlers of Catan on the weekend with one of my cousins and [inaudible] Quebec. And he was telling me this exact story.  Toby was telling me that they’re reopening the schools out in Quebec. It’s happening quicker out there than here. We have the short list for the next bank of Canada governor. It’s set to be down to two individuals.

one is,  so the two one is the,  as Carolyn Wilkins. She is the, I believe she’s the deputy central banker are currently kind of the right hand person to Steven pillows. And then the other one is potentially expected to be the Dean of the university.  I believe it’s the Rotman school of business. So those are kind of the two names that I’ve heard being bandied about for the next,  bank of Canada. Governor, I can’t believe,  that he’s leaving. It’s April 27. His job ends on June 3rd. He’s just gonna drop the mic and walk off into the sunset. Steven pillows is walking away in the midst of a crisis, I guess.  he had agreed to that timeline. He was sticking with it. So good for him, I guess.  oil tumbled a lot today. Oil had rallied in the last couple of days.

It’s down.  what was it down today? I think it was down 23%. It’s down four bucks below 13 bucks. Announced Brent crude is that 1999 natural gas at a dollar 83,  Ontario and build their plan today to, to reopen.  they’ve done it in three. They want to do it in three stages. So I did, this was announced late this afternoon. I just, I kind of saw that headline. I know that part of it is,  I believe later in may.  so they’re going, that’s, that’s been announced and that’s happening. I would expect for us to continue to see that,  throughout the,  I guess throughout the other provinces.  in the near future.  I mean the announcement, the announcement for the opening.  so the first step I believe is,  distancing measures or restrictions on gathering.  certain workplaces will have that kind of relieved, I guess stage two would be more businesses, service, retail offices, more outdoor places.

And stage three would be kind of all workplaces,  public gathering. So Ontario announced that today.  the other,  headlines,  that the treatment,  the municipal bond buying program that the U S announced and the article that we talked about,  the Tyson foods chairman warns that supply, the food supply chain is breaking.  I don’t know what to make of that. It could be concerning. I just feel like we will figure it out.  but again, I’m an optimist. I do recognize that there could be some issues there and I just really hope that we, you know, the people in charge there put some time and effort into figuring out the supply chain for food because obviously we don’t want anyone starving.  Berkshire Hathaway, they announced that they’re going to be changing. So they do the big, big, big kind of annual shareholder meeting in Omaha every single year.

And people kind of track down and they do this weekend and they camp out and they hope to get catch a glimpse of the Oracle of Omaha,  Warren buffet and his partner, Charlie Munger. But they’re not going to be doing it live. Obviously. It’s supposed to be, I think coming up here in a couple of weeks. Instead, they’re going to do it, I believe remotely. And the Charlie Munger will not be taking questions, so some changes there.  interesting note here about the last blockbuster honor. There’s one blockbuster honor and they are still renting movies during this pandemic. Our retail rates and residential rates moved as well today, so reach a real estate investment trust. So they moved up,  as well.  today was, they’d been beat up quite a bit. Somewhere down 40, 50%. They’re back up again today.  Tesla is canceling their plans to bring the workers back to the U S so this is kind of the headlines for today.

Some of the stocks that were up,  we had a, home Depot was a big JP Morgan Disney. Those three stocks were a big today,  reporting earnings. Tomorrow we got some big ones. Google is reporting tomorrow, their parent company, alphabet, Caterpillar, Pepsi, 3m. And we’re also gonna see some consumer confidence numbers. The  other things that I’m watching guys, if you want to know kind of what’s happening in your portfolio, you’re not sure we’re here. Oh, I say we’re here. We’re all here remotely.  we meet in the morning via zoom. I do my little staff meeting with its team. It’s really neat. We got our little boxes on zoom and get to see everyone at the same time. I’m sure those of you that are still working are likely doing the exact same thing from home. We do the same thing.  we’re here remotely,  to meet any needs that you have, whether it’s reviewing your financial plan, whether it’s taking a look at your asset allocation, whether it’s you need to invest more money into the market and you don’t exactly know how to do it.

We can talk about strategies for that. That can include, you know, legging into the market. You know, buying in as the market corrects, it can include buying in over time or it can include kind of just dumping it into the market. If it’s a smaller amount, we’re happy to discuss that with you. Thursday on the show, we’re going to go back to try to get my dad again. We’re going to be talking markets. Thursday will be a full full show on markets. We’re going to be doing the entire duration on. We’re going to take a look at the headlines. We’re going to take a look at, you know, what’s changed clothes and I’ll have some debates about, you know, what we think is likely to happened to the market I do to bring in some special guests next week as well for you. I will be reporting on that.

Please take a second to subscribe to my YouTube channel.  there it is on the bottom.  like our Facebook page. Subscribe to our YouTube channel. If you have any comments, I would love to hear from you. Please. If you want to speak to me, if you’d like to book a no obligation consultation, go to www.speaktorob.com it is also rolling at the bottom of the ticker there. I was thankful for you guys to join me today. It always means a lot to me to see you guys come in and tune in. I’m Rob Tetrault, portfolio manager from Canaccord Genuity wealth management here at the Tetrault wealth advisory group. Today was Monday, April 27th the market’s finished up. Let’s hope to see some green tomorrow. Guys. Hope you’re having a great day and a great week. Stay safe. Stay strong, guys. See you Thursday.

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